Archive for electricity

For Earth’s sake, don’t divorice!

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 Around the world, divorce rates have been increasing. Now, one expert proclaims divorcing is not being resourceful! 

According to Jianguo Liu, an ecologist at Michigan State University, Americans spend an extra $3.6 billion annually on water as a result of extra households created when people divorce.

“A married household actually uses resources more efficeintly than a divoriced household.”

Need examples? A household uses the same amount of heat or AC no matter if there are 2 or 4 people living in it. One person or several people will use just one refigerator. And two people in two seperate houses will cause 2 dishwashers to run. Two people share the same stove, watch the same TV, listen to the same radio and use the same lights.

The impact is big.

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In 2005, there were 16.5 million divorced people who headed their own household. This means $6.9 billion in extra utility costs annually, in addition to the extra $3.6 billion for water.

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Liu also studied other countries. By looking at 11 of them, which included Brazil, Greece, Ecuador, Costa Rica, Mexico and South Africa, he determined married couples could have saved energy. In fact,  he determined there could have been a million fewer housholds using water and energy in the 11 countries.

All the research was funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health and the Michigan Agricultural Experiement Station.

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The Lightbulb.

Before the invention of the light bulb, people used candles, lanterns and the sun to complete their everyday tasks.However, in the 1800s scientists were hard at work, attempting to be the first to invent a way to have electricity in the home. Eventually, science stumbled upon the incandescent bulb– the same type of bulb we use today.

Now there’s a NEW bulb in town, and it’s called the Compact Flourescent Light (CFL).

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Priced at less than $3 a pop, the CFL is [excuse the pun] lighting the way to a greener future. Designed like a swirly-cone ice cream, the CFL saves energy, saves money and could on a large-scale help save the environment. CFLs emit the same amount of light as regular incandescents, but uses 75% to 80% less electricity when compared. In fact, if one of every 110 million American households used just one CFL instead of an ordinary 60-watt incandescent bulb, the energy saved would be enough to power a city of 1.5 million people. That’s equivalent to taking 1.3 million cars off the road! (source).

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 In a world where global warming threatens to “interrupt” and “inconvenience” people’s lives– exchanging one lightbulb is as simple as, yes, screwing in a lightbulb. WalMart wants to sell its 100 million regular costumers just one lightbulb– that’s enough to make a difference.

It’s a simple solution to a complicated problem.

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