The Lightbulb.

Before the invention of the light bulb, people used candles, lanterns and the sun to complete their everyday tasks.However, in the 1800s scientists were hard at work, attempting to be the first to invent a way to have electricity in the home. Eventually, science stumbled upon the incandescent bulb– the same type of bulb we use today.

Now there’s a NEW bulb in town, and it’s called the Compact Flourescent Light (CFL).

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Priced at less than $3 a pop, the CFL is [excuse the pun] lighting the way to a greener future. Designed like a swirly-cone ice cream, the CFL saves energy, saves money and could on a large-scale help save the environment. CFLs emit the same amount of light as regular incandescents, but uses 75% to 80% less electricity when compared. In fact, if one of every 110 million American households used just one CFL instead of an ordinary 60-watt incandescent bulb, the energy saved would be enough to power a city of 1.5 million people. That’s equivalent to taking 1.3 million cars off the road! (source).

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 In a world where global warming threatens to “interrupt” and “inconvenience” people’s lives– exchanging one lightbulb is as simple as, yes, screwing in a lightbulb. WalMart wants to sell its 100 million regular costumers just one lightbulb– that’s enough to make a difference.

It’s a simple solution to a complicated problem.

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Global warming: who’s laughing?

Who’s laughing? Well apparently a lot of people.

Not many things, serious or not, get past Leno, Letterman and others. Global warming seems to be no exception to this rule. The fact that global warming is being joked about should be a compliment to activists like Al Gore who try to bring the climate crisis to the national spotlight. Nobody jokes about things that aren’t mainstream, and with global warming being poked-fun-at just about everywhere, it shows just how well-publicized the climate crisis is.

On the other hand, there are a lot more jokes than activism going on. Joking doesn’t help conserve energy, or bring about political reform. To some people, it makes a complete mockery of a serious issue. Jokes alone, aren’t the solution.

TAKE A LOOK, AND LET ME KNOW WHAT DO YOU THINK…  funny OR not?

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“Here’s good news: George W. Bush says that he is committed to fighting global warming. Yeah, well, he nipped that in the bud, didn’t he? … President Bush says he’s really going to buckle down now and fight global warming. As a matter of fact, he announced today he’s sending 20,000 troops to the sun”

–David Letterman

“President Bush told reporters he won’t see Al Gore’s documentary about the threat of global warming. He will not see it. On the other hand, Dick Cheney said he’s seen the global warming film five times, and it still cracks him up.”

–Conan O’Brien

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“According to a survey in this week’s Time magazine, 85% of Americans think global warming is happening. The other 15% work for the White House.”

                     –Jay Leno

 

Leave a comment, let me know: joking about global warming, FUNNY or NOT?

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the TODAY SHOW, “LIVE” from the polar icecaps!

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Matt Lauer was at the top of the Earth in Greenland.

Ann Curry reported from the bottom of the Earth at Antarctica’s McMurdo Station.

Al Roker joined them from a forest on the equator in Ecuador.

And putting it all in perspective was Al Gore, Nobel Prize winner and former vice president.

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Environmental journalism,” as it’s called, took a giant step into the national spotlight, as 3 of the TODAY SHOW’S top anchors were hosting from world’s away from each other. It was all to shed light on the environmental crisis facing our planet.

When I turned on the TV this morning, I couldn’t believe it was actually happening. A show known for its New York City Rockefeller Center studio, was now reporting from the top, bottom and exact middle of the Earth. Not only an amazing feat, but an ode to the amazing technology available in the communications world.

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I still laugh at those who question the planet’s climate crisis. Would the TODAY Show really travel all the way to the Arctic Circle just for kicks? They’re sending a message, and a strong one at that. NBC is just one of several large organizations taking a stand to bring climate change into the spotlight.

The 3 chosen locations by NBC are all linked by their environmental significance. Greenland is the largest island, and 81% of it is covered by ice. Antarctica holds 90% of the frozen water on our planet. Ecuador, the third location, hosts a large mist forest that consumes vast amounts of carbon dioxide.

“It’s about getting this message out to as many people as possible as quickly as possible.

We face a planetary emergency.”

Al Gore

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‘Poo and pee is our bread and butter’

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“Poo and pee is our bread and butter,” that’s what one zoo official is saying about his Dallas Zoo’s new energy plan.

The Dallas Zoo will soon be electrically powered by animal droppings, cardboard and tree limbs, with the additional help of a biogas generator. Although the project could cost up to $1 million dollars, the project is expected to pay for itself within 10 years.

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A zoo spokesperson says that the Dallas Zoo sees themselves not only as a fun place for families, but as a conservation organization.

Is anyone else afraid of what might happen if biogas generators start using, well, our droppings?

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Dehydration?

“An epic drought in Georgia threatens the water supply for millions.

Florida doesn’t have nearly enough water for its expected population boom.

The Great Lakes are shrinking.

Upstate New York’s reservoirs have dropped to record lows.

And in the West, the Sierra Nevada snowpack is melting faster each year.”

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It is estimated that 36 states will face water shortages within five years. Droughts, rising temperatures and a rising population all have contributed to the potential water crisis.

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Florida, California and Texas combined use 1/4 of the United States water. Making me ask, “HEY guys! What about the 47 rest of us??”

Desalination, recycling, and conservation are all solutions to the problem.

 

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But why is this happening?

1. Rising temperatures have caused glaciers to melt, and the sea level to rise. As the sea level rises, it pushes saltwater into the underground freshwater supply.

2. When landscapes are paved for roads, water can no longer penetrate the ground to replenish aquifers. Instead, cities pump water back into the ocean to prevent flooding.

3. The U.S. dumps most waste water into the ocean, instead of using it for irrigation.

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Do one of these. Atleast!

Okay. So many are guilty of preaching global warming to their friends blah blah blah without telling that friend what THEY can do. 

Consider yourself a friend and consider these.

 1. Use Compacy Flourescent Bulbs

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2. Keep your tires inflated (saves gas!)

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3. Take shorter showers

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4. Plant a tree

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5. Put on a sweatshirt if you’re cold (don’t turn up the heat)

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6. Turn off your computer at night

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7. Reduce garbage and recycle

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8. Carpool

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9. Go hybrid.

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10. Tell a friend!

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Curbside pick-up.

Everything you left at the end of your driveway last Tuesday probably ended up in a landfill.But, do you really know where that is and what that means?

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27% of trash is either recycled or composted, 16% is burned and 57% is buried in landfills.

 OK. So, they just “build” a landfill? Not exactly. This is what needs to be considered:

  • the area of land necessary for the landfill
  • the composition of the underlying soil and bedrock
  • the flow of surface water over the site
  • the impact of the proposed landfill on the local environment and wildlife
  • the historical or archaeological value of the proposed site
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    The landfill is lined with several layers, including a vital plastic layer to protect the contents from the environment. A landfill is also covered with soil daily. Inside a landfill there is very little oxygen and moisture, which means trash takes much longer to decompose than normal. Landfills are not meant to decompose trash. It merely provides a place for trash to be buried.

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    There were 1,654 active landfills in the U.S. in 2005.

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     Recycling in 2005, however, diverted 79 million tons of material away from landfills.

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